Perinatal Depression

Perinatal Depression

The Florida ECCS Impact Project emphasizes the importance of a two-generation approach by including perinatal depression as an area of concern. Two generational approaches focus on creating opportunities for and addressing needs of both vulnerable children and their parents together.1

Perinatal depression, which includes major and minor depressive episodes that occur during pregnancy or in the first 12 months after delivery, is one of the most common medical complications during pregnancy and the postpartum period, affecting one in seven women. It is important to identify pregnant and postpartum women with depression because untreated perinatal depression and other mood disorders can have devastating effects on women, infants, and families.2

Perinatal depression and family factors that contribute to it — intimate partner violence, trauma, stress, poor birth outcomes and infant mortality — compromise the nurturing relationships that are key to healthy child development.

1. “The Two-Generation Approach.” The Aspen Institute. 2016. Retrieved from http://ascend.aspeninstitute.org/pages/the-two-generation-approach
2. “Screening for perinatal depression.” Committee Opinion No. 630. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Obstet Gynecol 2015; 125:1268–71.